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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in britain have feared and loathed the tabloioifor years. case in point? remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew? >> 500,000 pounds when you can, to me -- open doors. >> reporter: and this headline. when prince harry angerer his girlfriend by visiting a strip club. how did the paper know? they'ves dropped on the prince's voicemail. >> you have to get the story at all costs. you go and do anything. >> reporter: even breaking the law? >> absolutely breaking the law. >> reporter: at least symbolically here in britain, it is the queen that prime ministers report to. what this scandal is up pressed for so long is revealing, is that rupert murdoch is the one who's really had their ear. every prime minister here for the last 30 years has needed the endorsement of murdoch and his media empire to win election. >> i think it's reasonable for any of us to observe that the murdoch corporatiti has too much power. >> reporter: outside "the news of the world" offices today, some celebrated the paper's downfall with a criminal investigation under way, many more could g
levels of power in britain. the people of this country shocked to learn for the last 30 years murdoch and his executives have been dictating policy to the politicians and the police. the murdoches certainly have the ear of britain's prime minister. in 15 months, cameron has had 26 meetinin with murdoch executives. how powerful was rupert murdoch here in britain? >> immensely p perful. the view of every prime minister for the last 30 years is that no one can get elected without the blessing of the patriarch. >> reporter: the now not clear that either murdoch can survive this crisis. news corporation shares have tumbled. if the company faces criminal charges it could be forced to unload some of its most lucative holdings in the u.s. including fox tv. this really is a dynasty on the brink. jeffrey kofmananabc news, london. >>> and coming up, the retirement revolution. one american city drawing boomers faster than any other. mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, b
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, thank you. >>> meantime, to the political fire storm playing out overseas tonight. britain's prime minister today, the latest to take a very public lashing as the scandal that's rocked billionaire rupert murdoch heightens. today, lawmakers sounded off about it and loudly. abc's jeffrey kofman is in london. >> reporter: the british, they are so polite. except when it comes to polit politics. >> the reply that he send -- >> reporter: that's david cameron, the british prime minister. >> you know -- >> reporter: today, facing 138 withering questions from the opposition. >> he just doesn't get it. >> reporter: no american president gets subjected to a verbal pounding like this. >> he should apologize for the catastrophic era of judgment he made. >> reporter: the issue? is cameron too close to murdoch? >> it shows my staff behaved entirely properly. >> reporter: they call this a debate. >> order! >> reporter: but to the speaker of the house, it is, well, childish. >> calm themselves, keep on an even keel. it's better for their health and for the house. >> reporter: this scandal may not s
headline. in 2002, britain was riveted by the story of 13-year-old milly dowler, who had vanished. this week, it was revealed that the paper listened to her voice mail, deleting old messages to make room for new ones. that activity gave her family and police hope that she was alive. false hope. milly was later found murdered. >> appalling, absolutely appalling. >> it's outrageous. it really is outrageous. >> reporter: and thehe's more. six years ago today, terrorist bombings in london killed 52. on this anniversary, grieving families learned that the newspaper hacked their cell phones, trolling for intimate details. one of those cell phones belonged to graham foulkes, who lost his son. >> it's a violation, isn't it? and i still don't know what i think about it, other than i'm really angry. really angry. >> reporter: it gets worse. today, allegations that the paper hackck voice mails of the families of british soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. paul mcmullan was a reporter and editor at "the news of the world." >> it was certainly a really commonplace practice. >> reporter: t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)